All About Adolescent Literacy

All about adolescent literacy. Resources for parents and educators of kids in grades 4-12.
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Text Size: A A A  

More Summer Fun

AdLit.org's annual list of good summer reads has a little something for everyone: we've got movie tie-ins, mystery, suspense, science fiction, historical fiction, romance, and adventure. If you can't find something here you like, you're just not trying!

I Love You, Beth Cooper

I Love You, Beth Cooper

Age Level: 16-18

It's not surprising that this novel has been made into a movie — author Larry Doyle has been a comedy screenwriter for some time, and this book reads like a screenplay. Taking place over one graduation day and night, it tells the story of nerdy Denis, who while making his graduation speech, blurts out "I Love You, Beth Cooper." Beth is popular, beautiful, and, as it soon turns out, more than Denis even imagined.

Peak

Peak

Age Level: 12-14

Peak is the son of two famous, now-divorced, climbers. (get it? Peak?) When arrested for attempting to scale a large city building, his punishment is to go live with his father. He soon discovers that his father has a plan for him — to be the youngest climber to scale Mount Everest. This cold weather adventure is perfect for reluctant guy readers, in fact it was recommended to me by middle-school students!

Me, the Missing, and the Dead

Me, the Missing, and the Dead

Age Level: 14-16

Lonely teenage Lucas becomes the keeper of some human ashes he finds neglected in a taxicab office. As he searches for their owner, some coincidences (HUGE coincidences!) lead him to realize the ashes may be tied to his M.I.A. father. Sure it's far-fetched, but it's far-fetched fun.

Exodus

Exodus

Age Level: 14-16

Another dystopic tale, this one in a futuristic world in which floods threaten to drown all of civilization. Mara sets out on a flotilla to find food and land, but some of those she encounters suspect she is more than just an ordinary 15-year old. The sequel, Zenith, is also available.

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games

Age Level: 14-16

This dystopian fantasy features a televised reality show in which two teenage representatives from each "district" must fight until only one is left standing. This book will bring to mind lots of classic works (most notable, The Lottery) but perhaps they will lead teen readers to those similar works as well.

Shift

Shift

Age Level: 14-16

Chris and Win decide to spend their summer between high school and college on a cross country bicycle trip. Win has always been somewhat secretive, but when Chris sees a huge amount of money in Win's belongings, he wonders if there's more to this trip than Win shared. And that's before Win disappears.

Babymouse #1: Queen of the World

Babymouse #1: Queen of the World

Illustrated by: Matthew Holm

Age Level: 9-12

Babymouse may be a cartoon mouse, but she has experiences that will resonate with her tween audience: like friend drama, boring old school, and the social strata of those same friends and school.

Bone

Bone

Age Level: 12-14

In the 1980's, Jeff Smith began his 13-volume fantasy epic about the Bone cousins and their quest through the valley. It's been referred to as a comic Lord of the Rings, (comic meaning both in comic form, and humorous.) This book collects all 13 volumes and is a perfect book for the big fan.

What I Saw and How I Lied

What I Saw and How I Lied

Age Level: 14-16

A genre-busting blend of mystery and historical fiction, this National Book Award winner is about Evie, a teenager vacationing in Palm Beach with her parents, post-World War II. While her parents concoct some unusual business deals, Evie falls in love with Peter, her Dad's war "buddy." But nothing, and I mean nothing, is as it seems.

My Sister's Keeper

My Sister's Keeper

Age Level: 16-18

Kate has suffered from leukemia since she was a toddler, and her younger sister Anna was conceived for the blood and bone marrow that would help Kate fight the disease. But when it seems Kate might need a kidney, Anna decides that, though she loves her sister, enough is enough.